Overview:

In recent years the use of hip testing both isokinetic and isometric testing has been on the increase.

The main areas the research has seemed to focus on are:

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)
Brunner et al. 2016
Diamond, Wrigley, Hinman 2015
Casartelli et al1. 2014
Casartelli et al2. 2012

Hip muscle function has been said to be altered in patients with FAI. Casartelli et al. (2012) described decreased isometric muscle strength (tested on an isokinetics machine) of the hip flexors, adductors, abductors and external rotators compared with controls. However, Diamond et al. (2015) only found 20% lower isometric abduction strength in FAI than controls (p = 0.04). With no significant differences in isometric strength for other muscle groups or peak isokinetic ER or IR strength. They did find the ratio of isometric, but not isokinetic, ER/IR strength was significantly higher in the FAI group (p = 0.01). But again there were no differences in the other ratios. The only really telling factor was angle of peak IR torque isokinetically which correlated with symptoms. Brunner et al. (2016) did not find significant isokinetic differences in hockey players with FAI. The study was of both symptomatic and asymptomatic players meaning isokinetic testing may not be a good diagnostic tool in this injury.

Falls and Hip Replacements
Morcelli et al. 2016
Melchiorri et al 2015
Rogers 2015

Normative Values
Bittencourt et al. 2016 (basketball, hockey, futsal or 5 a side soccer)
Brent et al. 2013 (male to female values in soccer and basketball)
Harbo , Brincks, and Andersen 2012 (normative values in population)

Positioning:

These movements can be performed in either the lying (supine), or seated (modified) positions.  

Overview:

Another test rising in popularity due to FAI and falls.

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI):

Hip muscle function has been said to be altered in patients with FAI. Casartelli et al. (2012) described decreased isometric muscle strength (tested using an isokinetics machine) of the adductors and abductors compared with controls. 

However, Diamond et al. (2015) only found 20% lower isometric abduction strength in FAI than controls (p = 0.04). With no significant differences in isometric strength for other muscle groups. 

Falls:

Rogers (2015) said younger adults engage a single more stable loaded-limb sidestep. This is achieved by actively unloading and advancing the limb.

Older adults use less stabilizing and hence more precarious multiple unloaded limb crossover and medial steps.

These differences in first-step recovery patterns appear to involve ageing decrements in hip AB-AD joint torque and power production.

Collectively, the use of multiple recovery steps during lateral perturbation trials, reduced maximum isokinetic hip Abd torque, and led to shorter global first step length. This reduction, Rogers (2015) postulated, could significantly predict future falls among older adults.

Positioning:

Although the position is referred to abduction and adduction because of the soft tissue opposition (one leg hits the other) the motion of adduction is normally described from abduction back to neutral (in lying) or slightly beyond (in standing).

These movements can be performed in either the lying (side or supine), or standing positions.  

Overview:

Testing hip flexion and extension is becoming more popular. Largely because of the increase in hip arthroscopies. More research is available although it is often contradictory. 

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI):

Casartelli et al.(2012) described decreased isokinetic (and isometric strength tested on a isokinetics machine) muscle strength of the hip flexors in patients with femoral acetabular impingement syndrome (FAI), compared with controls. However, Diamond et al. (2015) and Brunner et al. (2016) did not find a difference. 

Falls:

Borges et al. 2015 showed that strength around the hip does not fall as rapidly when aging as strength around the knee (strength fell by on average 10% less in the hip).

Positioning:

These movements can be performed in either the lying, or standing positions.